books on the radio


Thoughts on Applying to Present at #BNC11 in Toronto

Samantha Francis from BookNet Canada has posted the call for proposals for the BookNet Canada Technology Forum to be held on March 24, 2011, at the MaRS Centre in Toronto.

I attended the 2010 version of the BNC Tech Forum and it was interesting and educational. I wrote about it here.

Bob Miller and Richard Nash rocked the opening slots, Dominique Raccah delivered a great presentation, Ian Barker of SymText and Hugh McGuire of BookOven provided much-needed balance to the paranoia-inducing RFID session.

There was a party at the Pour House afterward courtesy of the awesomeness of Open Book Toronto and the Book Madam.  Guinness was consumed, I got to catch up with David Leonard, Clare Hitchens and Kimberly Walsh among many others.

All was good in with the world.

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But now maybe it’s time to start thinking about taking the next step, from attending/organizing conferences to  crafting a presentation that will create discussion. Help to move the conversation forward.

I’ve been working on the above presentation for a few months now – sharing/openness/P2P/infinite digital space – and I will be presenting it at the Surrey International Writers Conference later in October.

Can this presentation be recast and improved enough to be accepted for BNC11 in March? I think that it can.

Any suggestions on what direction I should take it? Thoughts on what/where I should focus?

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Books on the Radio TV Talks to Hugh McGuire

There’s a whole bunch of transformation happening at Books on the Radio these days.

My exploration of Skype video and Final Cut video editing software is progressing apace as you can see from this clip taken from a conversation that Hugh McGuire – Bookoven, Bite-Sized Edits, Librivox, BookCamp Toronto – and I had recently.

Also, I’m finally being joined by the Books on the Radio Street Team, a loosely organized group of passionate book lovers who will be helping to launch BOTR into its next iteration.

The website will be re-launched in the next few months and will be better able to showcase the many different types of media and storytelling platforms that we intend to use.



Sean Cranbury Talks Publishing 3.0 @ The Shebeen Club

Monday, January 18th, 2010. Sean Cranbury @ the Shebeen Club in Vancouver.

New Ideas, Opportunities, Communities: Living with Book Publishing 3.0

2009 was the year that Book Publishing came crashing into the present.

The digital revolution could no longer be kept at bay as this traditional industry was assailed on all sides.

The true revolutionaries didn’t loot and pillage, however – they leapt into action and quickly built opportunities for publishers, book professionals, writers and readers to come together and talk about these changes and to create the dialog around the changes to come.

Photo by Kris Krug.

The revolutionaries moved from a traditionally passive mode to one of activity and demonstration.

In this installment of the Shebeen Club, Sean Cranbury will discuss how the digital revolution has created opportunities for creative and passionate individuals to demonstrate their ideas, open up dialog and build new communities.

Vancouver has become a focal point for new ideas that are transforming the industry.  Bookcamp Vancouver demonstrated this nicely.

Sean will also discuss the increasing impact of social media technologies on book marketing, writer/reader relationship and its potential to turn publishing workflows upside down.

Join us for a lively Bookcamp-style discussion!

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Recommended Reading:

The Future of Publishing by Sean Cranbury & Hugh McGuire from Open Book: Toronto.

Shaping the Future of Publishing by Monique Trottier from BookNet Canada Blog.

eBooks Have Arrived by Hugh McGuire from BookNet Canada Blog.

The Unicorn Will Not Save Publishing by Kassia Kroszer from Booksquare.com.

Just When I Thought Publishing Couldn’t Get Any Worse by Richard Nash, Cursor.

The Emergent Landscape, or, the Continuous Permanent Reinvention of Publishing by Richard Nash, Cursor.

It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times… by Bob Miller, Harper Studio.

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Sean Cranbury is a Vancouver writer, editor, broadcaster and social media consultant.

He was an organizer of Bookcamp Vancouver 2009 and his radio show/blog, Books on the Radio, is broadcast on CJSF 90.1 FM.  He also writes for the Vancouver Biennale and the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative.

Sean is co-creator of the ridiculously successful viral, community-based book recommendation site, the Advent Book Blog, and is also working on the real-time collaborative fiction experiment called Eyes of Vancouver.

Eyes of Vancouver aims to demonstrate a potential new workflow for publishers and independent or self-published authors that puts community-building first and physical publication last.

You can find Sean:

sean@booksontheradio.ca
@seancranbury
@eyesofvancouver



Bookcamp Vancouver 2009: Book Publishing Throwdown

BookCampVancouverXXY

Friday October 16th, 2009 was a good day for book publishing in Vancouver.

I’m still fairly exhausted from the whole thing.  I’ll be writing a piece on the event in the next week or so once my senses return to normal and the blood returns to my feet.

But I will take this opportunity to thank everyone who came and participated in the event.  The volunteers and fellow organizers did an amazing job of executing a near flawless day and one that we should all be proud of.

I’m not even talking about the lunch!  Big props to Out to Lunch Catering for making us look good.

And yes, the words ‘Next Year‘ have already been uttered.



Cranbury v. McGuire: The Future of Publishing Interview

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Sometime around the middle of August I got an email from Amy Logan-Holmes at Open Book: Toronto asking whether I would be interested in participating in something called the 48 Hour Interview that would run in their Fall Issue.

She described it as an email exchange or co-interview between two people working within the books/publishing industry.  The participants are free to discuss whatever they like provided that the ‘interview’ occurs within 48 consecutive hours and, I suppose, is at least tangentially related to the business at hand.

So I’m thinking, “Ok, that sounds doable.  I wonder who she’s going to pair me up with?”

And, of course, it was Hugh McGuire, co-creator of Book Oven and Librivox.org.  Organizer of BookCamp Toronto and well-coiffed confidante of the Digital Literati.

No pressure, right?

None.

It was a great, if somewhat long, interview that really dug into some key issues facing the evolving – convulsing? – book publishing industry today.

The whole thing was edited and punched into shape by the very talented Clelia Scala.  Many thanks to Hugh and everyone at Open Book: Toronto.

For an example of something that I wrote for the interview that may or may not be interesting, please click the little red (more…) button below.

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