books on the radio


The Golden Rules of Filming by Jim Jarmusch
June 13, 2010, 9:54 AM
Filed under: Events | Tags: , , ,

The Golden Rules of Filming by Jim Jarmusch.

I would like to submit that these rules written by Jim Jarmusch and pasted above/below can apply to any creative pursuit whether it’s writing, painting, graphic design, interactive media, whatever.

We all know that it’s not uncommon for creators and attendant financiers, distribution agencies, assorted middlemen to regard one another with suspicion, mistrust or wariness.

That’s just part of the game and being able to see clearly how these relationships function is essential for creators who want to protect and foster their vision while reaching the popular imagination.

I think that Jarmusch does a nice job of using really clear language to articulate the essence of how an individual creator can stay true to their vision.

Rule #1: There are no rules. There are as many ways to make a film as there are potential filmmakers. It’s an open form. Anyway, I would personally never presume to tell anyone else what to do or how to do anything. To me that’s like telling someone else what their religious beliefs should be. Fuck that. That’s against my personal philosophy—more of a code than a set of “rules.” Therefore, disregard the “rules” you are presently reading, and instead consider them to be merely notes to myself. One should make one’s own “notes” because there is no one way to do anything. If anyone tells you there is only one way, their way, get as far away from them as possible, both physically and philosophically.

Rule #2: Don’t let the fuckers get ya. They can either help you, or not help you, but they can’t stop you. People who finance films, distribute films, promote films and exhibit films are not filmmakers. They are not interested in letting filmmakers define and dictate the way they do their business, so filmmakers should have no interest in allowing them to dictate the way a film is made. Carry a gun if necessary.

Also, avoid sycophants at all costs. There are always people around who only want to be involved in filmmaking to get rich, get famous, or get laid. Generally, they know as much about filmmaking as George W. Bush knows about hand-to-hand combat.

Rule #3: The production is there to serve the film. The film is not there to serve the production. Unfortunately, in the world of filmmaking this is almost universally backwards. The film is not being made to serve the budget, the schedule, or the resumes of those involved. Filmmakers who don’t understand this should be hung from their ankles and asked why the sky appears to be upside down.

Rule #4: Filmmaking is a collaborative process. You get the chance to work with others whose minds and ideas may be stronger than your own. Make sure they remain focused on their own function and not someone else’s job, or you’ll have a big mess. But treat all collaborators as equals and with respect. A production assistant who is holding back traffic so the crew can get a shot is no less important than the actors in the scene, the director of photography, the production designer or the director. Hierarchy is for those whose egos are inflated or out of control, or for people in the military. Those with whom you choose to collaborate, if you make good choices, can elevate the quality and content of your film to a much higher plane than any one mind could imagine on its own. If you don’t want to work with other people, go paint a painting or write a book. (And if you want to be a fucking dictator, I guess these days you just have to go into politics…).

Rule #5: Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination. Devour old films, new films, music, books, paintings, photographs, poems, dreams, random conversations, architecture, bridges, street signs, trees, clouds, bodies of water, light and shadows. Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is nonexistent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery—celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”

– –

Jim Jarmusch, in MovieMaker Magazine #53 – Winter, January 22, 2004



XL Recordings Leverages Copyright Takedown Notice as Marketing Initiative for New MIA Record
April 27, 2010, 1:57 PM
Filed under: Copyright | Tags: , , , ,

[NOTE:This is a front loaded addendum to my original post.

This video continues to be posted and then taken down.  I have reposted it several times.

It has been more than 10 years since Napster and we have seen the RIAA and others attempt to control the spread of digital content online with little success.

Because we are intelligent people we believe that people in the record industry know better than this.  We also believe that they’re basically cynical pricks who’d force their own mother to be a body double in a remake of Throw Momma From the Train if they thought that they could make a few bucks doing it.

So, we’re retitling this post as follows:

XL Recordings Leverages Copyright Takedown Notice as Marketing Initiative for New MIA Record

Luckily, MIA is a visionary artist who knows what needs to be done in circumstances like this.  She has posted the complete video on her site, MIAUK.com.

This whole audience-direct-to-artist relationship is looking better and better by the day.

Original post is below.]

XL Recordings is putting a heavy hand down on the release of this video.  Sending out the usual takedown requests for youtube uploads and MIA herself has BOOOO’d those actions taken by her record label.

Not ironically the song is called ‘Born Free’ and this video is an intense and graphic piece of work.

On many musical, visual and lyrical levels this song embodies what David Shields calls ‘Reality Hunger‘.  Borrowing without asking, mixing and remixing across multiple media and different decades.

All synthesized into this cool 9 minute video.  There’s so many references to argue, discuss and explore in this video.

We need more of this.

For some excellent analysis and background check out Ann Powers’ piece, MIA Makes Her Stance Utterly Clear… in the LA Times and August Brown’s piece on MIA’s use of Suicide’s song Ghost Rider as the basis for this track.

Here’s a lyric from the song:

I don’t wanna talk about money, ’cause I got it
And I don’t wanna talk about hoochies, ’cause I been it
And I don’t wanna be that fake?, but you can do it
And imitators, yeah, speak it

An intense piece of work!  Can’t wait for the record to drop!



Thoughts on the Arrival of Amazon to Canada

Cultural Industry? Online sales? Protecton from Competition?

A week or so ago I wrote a piece criticizing Chapters/Indigo for not having any stock of David Shields’ new hard cover front list title, Reality Hunger, a day after the announced release date.

Not only did they have no stock, they had yet to place an order for this book that was getting embarrassingly good media coverage among the tastemakers of the pop culture world and the pillars of the establishment.

Fine.  Not a single physical copy available for sale in the entire country.

If I was responsible for sales for the largest publisher in the English speaking world I’d be satisfied with zero copies available for purchase in the largest chain store in an entire territory, as well.  Who wouldn’t?

That’s how you support the people in marketing & publicity who have just busted their asses to get the word out via Bookslut, Fader Magazine, The NYT, Globe and Mail, the Millions etc… right?

By not having books physically available for sale.

*

But whatever, as my friends working in the industry exclaimed at once, your expectations are too high for both parties.

“Why don’t you just go online and buy it?” They asked, as tho they’d suddenly become a chorus from Thucydides.

*

Cold realism & harsh efficiency.  Those are the touchstones of book publishing.

Don’t bother us with your questions about a new book of literary criticism, we’ve got LOLCat Colleckshuns to sell.

Get over it, Cranbury, buy the fucking book online and quit having expectations based on this antiquated notion of brick and mortar supply chain fulfillment.

What do you think this is, 2004?

*

So we’ve collectively recognized publicly and finally that brick and mortar stores are a tertiary concern.  Well down the list of checkable priorities.

Online ordering is how people shop – hell, I buy a lot of books thru Amazon – and that’s just the plain facts.

Fine, no problem.

We’ve seen Chapters/Indigo, Costco, Amazon, Wal-Mart and their kin eviscerate any semblance of competition from independent booksellers in this country and elsewhere over the past 15 years and completely change the book publishing landscape.

We’ve learned to accept that.

BookExpo Canada, like poor old Humber Humbert, died of coronary thrombosis in the spring of 2009.

It’s over, the game has changed.

OK, I get it.

*

So why is there even an agrument against Amazon coming in to Canada and setting up a distribution centre?

Increased efficiency & lower prices.  That’s what we want, right?

Competition drives the price down and keeps everybody honest.  Hell, books might actually be available when customers want them.

Who needs a traditional supply chain?

And, really, why would we seek to protect Chapters/Indigo from competition?



David Shields’ Reality Hunger: Mostly Not Available in Canada

No Appetite for Physical Book Sales

* NOTE: Big respect to the people at Chapters/Indigo – and one person in particular who will remain nameless until such a time as I get the OK to mention said person by name – for hustling to get this book into stores in Canada and for staying in touch with me during the process.

The book is available at the Robson Street store in Vancouver and I encourage everyone who has even a foggy inclination about this book to go and buy it and to join the conversation about it.

Agree or disagree or suffer from indifference, I think it’s important and I’m glad that people can now walk into a bookstore in Vancouver and other places and buy it from another human being!

Thanks!*

Very simply: I do not understand why David Shields’ hugely anticipated new book, Reality Hunger, is not available for sale at the brick and mortar version of Canada’s national big box book chain, Chapters/Indigo.

I come at this scenario from 2 points of view:

1) I’m a fan of David Shields and have been following the media coverage and build-up for this book for months.

The contentious debate around literary remixing, appropriation, creativity & attribution brought on by Helene Hegemann, the 17 year-old German novelist whose been accused of accelerating worldwide copyright apocalypse only stokes the fire.

2) My experience is as a bookseller/buyer for independent stores and the Virgin Megastore.  And as a book lover, a reader, someone who wants to buy books.

It is impossible for me to understand how a book by an established writer that is receiving this much advanced media attention is not stacked high on the display tables at the front of the store by the time the doors open for business on the date of release.

And if that’s not in the cards – for a host of complicated reasons – then how about at least having a few copies available for idiots like me who still occasionally enjoy the 3-dimensional experience of buying a book from a human being?

Who still consider release dates to be a piece of meaningful communication between publisher and audience.  A kind of promise.

The date of release, by the way, was last Tuesday, February 23rd.

*

Here’s the story: I didn’t actually expect Chapters/Indigo to have copies at the doors, stacked high on the release date.  I live in Vancouver and everything in the physical book trade supply chain takes longer to get here.

No problem, we’re used to it.

Also, this is books that we’re talking about, not music or movies, so the sense of urgency and coordination to satisfy the hunger of the audience that has been piqued by well-placed coverage in the media is diminished.

Or non-existent.

Anyway, so I wait a day and then check the Chapters/Indigo website to see whether Reality Hunger is showing in-stock at any of the Vancouver locations.

Apparently not.  I could order it from them online, sure, but all physical locations are showing a stock level of zero.

So I called one of the stores and spoke to a very helpful young man who told me that there were no copies at any Chapters/Indigo stores in the entire country of Canada as it had not yet been ordered.

Not yet been ordered.  Got that?

A day after the release date, the largest retailer in the country hadn’t even placed an order!

Reality Hunger isn’t published by a small press with limited sales and distribution power, it’s a front list book published by one of the largest publishers in the world, Random House.

As a fan and former bookseller this makes absolutely zero sense.

Is this some new tactic in the battle against digital piracy?  Like, maybe if the book isn’t available at all no one will want to steal it?

*

Am I expecting too much?

*

One can surely make the argument that I am expecting too much.

That Chapters/Indigo took a pass on this title because it’s some obscure book of essays and literary criticism by an American author.  That there would be no appeal to the Canadian audience.

This despite the fact that it’s a Random House front-list title on the influence of reality culture and contains a feast of quotes printed on the front cover from the likes of Jonathan Lethem, Patricia Hempl, Geoff Dyer and Albert Goldbarth, and has been reviewed by the likes of Chuck Klosterman and Zadie Smith.

But whatever, right?  It’s not like people actually read anymore.  Lethem, Klosterman, Zadie Smith?  Nobody cares what those people think.  They have no influence.

Speaking of having no influence on consumer behavior, here’s a list of some of the media outlets that have reviewed, discussed and generated awareness for the release of Reality Hunger over the past few months: Guardian Books Podcast, The Believer, Fader Magazine, The Globe and Mail, The Millions, Seattle Times, Pop Matters, The Huffington Post, Bookslut, New York Times.

Ahem.

*

Frustrated to the point of despair, I called around to all the bookstores in Vancouver and none of them carried it, though they could certainly special order it for me.  It would only take about a week.

Thanks, no.

The only bookstore that I contacted that had copies in their store, ready to be bought by customers, was Bolen Books in Victoria.

I contacted the affable, Springsteen-loving Rob Wiersema and he informed me that they had 5 copies on display.

Kudos, as always, to the independents (and especially Rob, who as President for Life of the BC Bookseller’s Association, is always out there reprezentin’ the tribe;).

And David Shields can rest assured that at least 5 readers living on an island off Canada’s west coast will be reading his book.

As for the rest of the country? Not so much.

*

One reason that I care enough about this to write this post is because I think that Reality Hunger is going to be an important book.

That it’s going to do what nearly every single other book published this year will fail to do: generate real conversation and debate across a variety of disciplines about the nature of creative expression, copyright and attribution in the 21st century.

Crucial issues as the passionate response to the story about Helen Hegmann’s book demonstrates.

Another reason is that I hate to see writers, readers & book lovers so brutally under served by the dumb beast of corporate bookselling.

In an era where there’s constant uncertainty about the influence of digital sales and distribution to the traditional supply chain how can a major publisher not provide physical books to the largest book retailer in an entire country?

With that much media – Huffington Post, New York Times, Fader Magazine (calls it the Hip Hop Album of the Year!), the Globe and Mail, Bookslut, the Guardian Books Podcast – how is it possible that Chapters/Indigo slept on placing an initial order?

Has this appetite for immediacy – this Reality Hunger – killed the ability of book publishing’s marketing and supply chain to work effectively together to serve the reader on time with physical book sales?

Is it wrong for me to expect to be able to walk into a major book retailer and buy a copy of a widely publicized book on the date of release?

Or are we happy to relegate all sales of physical books to independents and online sales channels?

Has digital effectively won the battle so soon?