books on the radio


Thoughts on Applying to Present at #BNC11 in Toronto

Samantha Francis from BookNet Canada has posted the call for proposals for the BookNet Canada Technology Forum to be held on March 24, 2011, at the MaRS Centre in Toronto.

I attended the 2010 version of the BNC Tech Forum and it was interesting and educational. I wrote about it here.

Bob Miller and Richard Nash rocked the opening slots, Dominique Raccah delivered a great presentation, Ian Barker of SymText and Hugh McGuire of BookOven provided much-needed balance to the paranoia-inducing RFID session.

There was a party at the Pour House afterward courtesy of the awesomeness of Open Book Toronto and the Book Madam.  Guinness was consumed, I got to catch up with David Leonard, Clare Hitchens and Kimberly Walsh among many others.

All was good in with the world.

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But now maybe it’s time to start thinking about taking the next step, from attending/organizing conferences to  crafting a presentation that will create discussion. Help to move the conversation forward.

I’ve been working on the above presentation for a few months now – sharing/openness/P2P/infinite digital space – and I will be presenting it at the Surrey International Writers Conference later in October.

Can this presentation be recast and improved enough to be accepted for BNC11 in March? I think that it can.

Any suggestions on what direction I should take it? Thoughts on what/where I should focus?



SFU Summer Publishing Workshops: Sign Up Now to Attend

Sign Up Now to Study Book Publishing in Vancouver, Summer 2010.

Summertime in Vancouver

+ studying book/magazine publishing at SFU

= some kind of perfect bliss.

It’s time for you to do some serious thinking about coming out to Vancouver to bask in the glory of one of the best book publishing programs in the world.  And to experience the radiant, sublime amazingness of this city at the height of summer.

Bleeding Edge Ideas Calmly Discussed.

SFU has unveiled their program for the 2010 Summer Publishing Workshops and it looks pretty serious.

Some of the best and most experienced people in the business combined with some of the brightest lights in new media will be on hand to give students an unforgettable learning experience.

Vancouver is home to some of the best doers and thinkers in the digital area.

People who not only actively engage the web, social media and the digital landscape but who are excellent communicators about that experience.

There’s no better example of this than Lisa Manfield and Rebecca Bollwit on Marketing Magazines Online.

Unless, of course, we’re talking about the Justice League of America style panel that’ll be leading students through the session called Digital Strategy: Editor’s Intensive featuring: John ‘Hawkman’ Maxwell, Joy ‘Invisible Plane’ Gugler, Boris ‘Aquaman’ Mann and Monique ‘Super Girl’ Trottier.

Just take a moment to think about those people.  Check out those links and look at the quality of work that they do.

What kind of ideas are they capable of unlocking in you?

And I haven’t even mentioned industry powerhouse thinkers like O’Reilly Media’s Andrew Savikas, Neelan Choksi of Lexcycle, Mark Coker from Smashwords, Chris Lanbonte, Ali Cairns and Jesse Finkelstein from D&M Publishers, Sarah ‘Smart Bitches‘ Wendell, Richard Nash, and Kobo’s Michael Tamblyn to name only a few.

Learn the Fundamentals from Industry Masters.

And there’s much knowledge and wisdom to be gleaned from the best minds in traditional publishing, too.

Take a look at this roll call of industry vets:

Tom Best from HB Fenn and Key Porter Books, Randy Chan, Brad Martin and Kristin Cochrane from Random House Canada, Simon and Schuster Canada’s Kevin Hanson, Donna Hayes from Harlequin Enterprises, the legendary David Kent from Harper Collins Canada, Brian Lam from Vancouver’s Arsenal Pulp Press and Kevin Williams from TalonBooks will all be on hand to give you the 411 on the real challenges and opportunities that the book publishing industry faces going forward.

Pretty frickin’ amazing.

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So here’s the deal: Think about it, then do something about it.

The best minds in traditional book and magazine publishing + guiding lights in new media + sunlight, Stanley Park, mountains and the Pacific Ocean.

The answer to the question is Yes.  As in “Yes, I’m going to do it,” and “Yes, I’m going to take advantage of this opportunity.”

Imagine what you’ll learn.  Imagine the new ideas, fresh perspectives and great people that you’ll meet.

And I’ll be there, too.  I’ll be reprising and updating the talk that I gave last year called Digital Rights Management vs the Inevitability of Free Content.

For more info on what courses are available, a full list of faculty and details on costing and accommodation please check the SFU Publishing Workshops website and/or send me an email.

Hope to see you there.



Richard Nash Interview at O’Reilly Tools of Change Conference
February 23, 2010, 7:20 PM
Filed under: Industry Change | Tags: , , , ,

An excellent video snapshot of some of the common arguments arriving at the intersection of traditional book publishing and digital influence.

Some choice quotes from this short interview:

“[We can create} self-organizing, self-perpetuating, self-selecting communities around a reading/writing platform that allows people to discover like-minded people across the planet.”

“I want our communities to not always be so self-evident or narrowly defined by genre in the ways that we have understood that in the past because one of the things that the web allows us to do is free ourselves from limiting our choices to, say, 20 genres… allowing for unlimited hybridization, cross-pollination and increased narrative specificity for writers and audiences.” [Words in italics are mine – a DJ Cranbury remix of Richard Nash.]

“On the internet nobody knows your gay knitting dog.”

Thank you, Richard.  Well done.



Sean Cranbury Talks Publishing 3.0 @ The Shebeen Club

Monday, January 18th, 2010. Sean Cranbury @ the Shebeen Club in Vancouver.

New Ideas, Opportunities, Communities: Living with Book Publishing 3.0

2009 was the year that Book Publishing came crashing into the present.

The digital revolution could no longer be kept at bay as this traditional industry was assailed on all sides.

The true revolutionaries didn’t loot and pillage, however – they leapt into action and quickly built opportunities for publishers, book professionals, writers and readers to come together and talk about these changes and to create the dialog around the changes to come.

Photo by Kris Krug.

The revolutionaries moved from a traditionally passive mode to one of activity and demonstration.

In this installment of the Shebeen Club, Sean Cranbury will discuss how the digital revolution has created opportunities for creative and passionate individuals to demonstrate their ideas, open up dialog and build new communities.

Vancouver has become a focal point for new ideas that are transforming the industry.  Bookcamp Vancouver demonstrated this nicely.

Sean will also discuss the increasing impact of social media technologies on book marketing, writer/reader relationship and its potential to turn publishing workflows upside down.

Join us for a lively Bookcamp-style discussion!

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Recommended Reading:

The Future of Publishing by Sean Cranbury & Hugh McGuire from Open Book: Toronto.

Shaping the Future of Publishing by Monique Trottier from BookNet Canada Blog.

eBooks Have Arrived by Hugh McGuire from BookNet Canada Blog.

The Unicorn Will Not Save Publishing by Kassia Kroszer from Booksquare.com.

Just When I Thought Publishing Couldn’t Get Any Worse by Richard Nash, Cursor.

The Emergent Landscape, or, the Continuous Permanent Reinvention of Publishing by Richard Nash, Cursor.

It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times… by Bob Miller, Harper Studio.

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Sean Cranbury is a Vancouver writer, editor, broadcaster and social media consultant.

He was an organizer of Bookcamp Vancouver 2009 and his radio show/blog, Books on the Radio, is broadcast on CJSF 90.1 FM.  He also writes for the Vancouver Biennale and the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative.

Sean is co-creator of the ridiculously successful viral, community-based book recommendation site, the Advent Book Blog, and is also working on the real-time collaborative fiction experiment called Eyes of Vancouver.

Eyes of Vancouver aims to demonstrate a potential new workflow for publishers and independent or self-published authors that puts community-building first and physical publication last.

You can find Sean:

sean@booksontheradio.ca
@seancranbury
@eyesofvancouver



Monique Trottier, Kassia Krozser, Richard Nash and Cory Doctorow
May 11, 2009, 7:52 PM
Filed under: Enthusiasms | Tags: , , , ,

During the early days of planning Books on the Radio I put together a Facebook group – just something quick and fun that could kind of stand as a bookmark to future intentions.  I would occasionally post links there for people to peruse but mostly I would post the links to remind myself to come back to these things later.

Well, later is now.  Here’s some of the more interesting people whose writing and ideas about books have influenced my vision for the show.

So Misguided: Monique Trottier is leading the revolution.  This is her blog about books, the book industry, technology and marketing.  Smart, passionate and ready to help.

Booksquare: Voice of the shifting sands.  Funny, passionate dissection of the publishing industry with a focus on the technologies.  Essential reading for anyone interested in the future of the book.

Richard Nash: Ex-Soft Skull guru has gone solo.  One of the strongest and most experienced voices in the conversation.  He’s not afraid to advocate experimentation.

The Book Publicity Blog – Pretty self-explanatory.  Excellent, straight-forward style.

This could go on all day.

I think that these four links are good for now – but it should be noted that you’re really not going anywhere in this conversation about books, the future of books, the ascendant technologies, copyright or whatever, without the expressed written consent of Cory Doctorow.   Check out his craphound blog and if you’re not regularly hitting up the boingboing then please check yourself for a pulse.