books on the radio


Sean Cranbury Talks Publishing 3.0 @ The Shebeen Club

Monday, January 18th, 2010. Sean Cranbury @ the Shebeen Club in Vancouver.

New Ideas, Opportunities, Communities: Living with Book Publishing 3.0

2009 was the year that Book Publishing came crashing into the present.

The digital revolution could no longer be kept at bay as this traditional industry was assailed on all sides.

The true revolutionaries didn’t loot and pillage, however – they leapt into action and quickly built opportunities for publishers, book professionals, writers and readers to come together and talk about these changes and to create the dialog around the changes to come.

Photo by Kris Krug.

The revolutionaries moved from a traditionally passive mode to one of activity and demonstration.

In this installment of the Shebeen Club, Sean Cranbury will discuss how the digital revolution has created opportunities for creative and passionate individuals to demonstrate their ideas, open up dialog and build new communities.

Vancouver has become a focal point for new ideas that are transforming the industry.  Bookcamp Vancouver demonstrated this nicely.

Sean will also discuss the increasing impact of social media technologies on book marketing, writer/reader relationship and its potential to turn publishing workflows upside down.

Join us for a lively Bookcamp-style discussion!

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Recommended Reading:

The Future of Publishing by Sean Cranbury & Hugh McGuire from Open Book: Toronto.

Shaping the Future of Publishing by Monique Trottier from BookNet Canada Blog.

eBooks Have Arrived by Hugh McGuire from BookNet Canada Blog.

The Unicorn Will Not Save Publishing by Kassia Kroszer from Booksquare.com.

Just When I Thought Publishing Couldn’t Get Any Worse by Richard Nash, Cursor.

The Emergent Landscape, or, the Continuous Permanent Reinvention of Publishing by Richard Nash, Cursor.

It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times… by Bob Miller, Harper Studio.

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Sean Cranbury is a Vancouver writer, editor, broadcaster and social media consultant.

He was an organizer of Bookcamp Vancouver 2009 and his radio show/blog, Books on the Radio, is broadcast on CJSF 90.1 FM.  He also writes for the Vancouver Biennale and the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative.

Sean is co-creator of the ridiculously successful viral, community-based book recommendation site, the Advent Book Blog, and is also working on the real-time collaborative fiction experiment called Eyes of Vancouver.

Eyes of Vancouver aims to demonstrate a potential new workflow for publishers and independent or self-published authors that puts community-building first and physical publication last.

You can find Sean:

sean@booksontheradio.ca
@seancranbury
@eyesofvancouver

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BC Bookseller’s Round-Up: Initiating and Adapting to Change

During the past weekend I spoke to the British Columbia Booksellers Association at their annual conference.  I was asked to speak to the group about social media, community building and engaging the digital world to get the word out.  An interesting proposition, for sure, but everything went really well.  The booksellers were really enthusiastic, asked a ton of questions and I think that everybody came away from the weekend feeling like they had learned a few things and made a few new friends.  I know that I did.

One of the ideas that I suggested to booksellers interested in learning more about blogging and other social networking opportunities is to start their digital journey by listening to and reading the people who are already really good at it.  I recommended Kassia Krozser of Booksquare and Julie Wilson of Toronto’s House of Anansi Press and Seen Reading as excellent resources for the beginner.

To my joy and delight Booksquare has published the perfect blog post to support my recommendations.  To quote…

“It is surely the rare soul in the publishing ecosystem who believes the business tomorrow will resemble the business of today. Change, being change, is messy stuff, best managed through experimentation. You can design the best process in the world, but until real people get their hands in the system, you don’t really know what will work and how. Change is iterative…

…The booksellers who remain standing — and there will be many! — will react to these losses by changing their retail mix to accommodate new customers while incorporating new sales channels, such as digital. In the physical sense, there is only so much shelf space, and booksellers will, necessarily, be more particular and more aggressive about fresh product. The sheer volume of annual releases, with new titles coming out weekly, leaves the bookseller little room for chancy purchases and backroom stock.

Inventory management will be elevated to an art form as booksellers try to balance the slower reactions of customers who rely upon word-of-mouth with those who chase the latest and greatest. Factor in the enduring popularity of catalog titles, and it’s not hard to see that booksellers will be leaner and meaner (oh, and leaner and meaner indicates that booksellers will be purchasing fewer units because, well, managing returns for credit or cash is not a cheap endeavor).”



Monique Trottier, Kassia Krozser, Richard Nash and Cory Doctorow
May 11, 2009, 7:52 PM
Filed under: Enthusiasms | Tags: , , , ,

During the early days of planning Books on the Radio I put together a Facebook group – just something quick and fun that could kind of stand as a bookmark to future intentions.  I would occasionally post links there for people to peruse but mostly I would post the links to remind myself to come back to these things later.

Well, later is now.  Here’s some of the more interesting people whose writing and ideas about books have influenced my vision for the show.

So Misguided: Monique Trottier is leading the revolution.  This is her blog about books, the book industry, technology and marketing.  Smart, passionate and ready to help.

Booksquare: Voice of the shifting sands.  Funny, passionate dissection of the publishing industry with a focus on the technologies.  Essential reading for anyone interested in the future of the book.

Richard Nash: Ex-Soft Skull guru has gone solo.  One of the strongest and most experienced voices in the conversation.  He’s not afraid to advocate experimentation.

The Book Publicity Blog – Pretty self-explanatory.  Excellent, straight-forward style.

This could go on all day.

I think that these four links are good for now – but it should be noted that you’re really not going anywhere in this conversation about books, the future of books, the ascendant technologies, copyright or whatever, without the expressed written consent of Cory Doctorow.   Check out his craphound blog and if you’re not regularly hitting up the boingboing then please check yourself for a pulse.