books on the radio


Thoughts on Applying to Present at #BNC11 in Toronto

Samantha Francis from BookNet Canada has posted the call for proposals for the BookNet Canada Technology Forum to be held on March 24, 2011, at the MaRS Centre in Toronto.

I attended the 2010 version of the BNC Tech Forum and it was interesting and educational. I wrote about it here.

Bob Miller and Richard Nash rocked the opening slots, Dominique Raccah delivered a great presentation, Ian Barker of SymText and Hugh McGuire of BookOven provided much-needed balance to the paranoia-inducing RFID session.

There was a party at the Pour House afterward courtesy of the awesomeness of Open Book Toronto and the Book Madam.  Guinness was consumed, I got to catch up with David Leonard, Clare Hitchens and Kimberly Walsh among many others.

All was good in with the world.

*

But now maybe it’s time to start thinking about taking the next step, from attending/organizing conferences to  crafting a presentation that will create discussion. Help to move the conversation forward.

I’ve been working on the above presentation for a few months now – sharing/openness/P2P/infinite digital space – and I will be presenting it at the Surrey International Writers Conference later in October.

Can this presentation be recast and improved enough to be accepted for BNC11 in March? I think that it can.

Any suggestions on what direction I should take it? Thoughts on what/where I should focus?

Advertisements


BookNet Canada Investigates

bnc_header_2I only met Morgan Cowie of BookNet Canada very briefly during the BookCamp Toronto event but it wasn’t hard to recognize her genuine passion and enthusiasm.  She participated in the Death to DRM session that I lead in the morning and contributed great ideas to Lisa Charter’s session on the Quagmire of International Rights.  Unafraid to speak up and contribute, she may have been the secret star of the event.  But more on BookCamp Toronto in my next post.

Now Morgan is writing about the signal flares of interesting innovations in publishing and digital distribution on the BookNet Canada blog.  She’s started to write ‘intermittently’ on new publishing business models.  In her first two posts she highlights developments in ‘liquid textbooks‘ and the still mysterious to me thing called Scribd.